Marketing Your Business and Staying in Business

Before you take the leap and start your own photography business, you need to consider three very important questions and know how you’ll use different marketing techniques to help maintain a sustainable business.

From naming your company to designing your website, Karl looks at the various marketing materials you could use to draw attention to your business. Using examples of his own work, he covers identifying your market and reaching potential clients, defining your brand, building a portfolio, tackling social media and website design and much, much more.

He also offers various different tips and also points out common marketing mistakes and how to avoid them.

Class objectives:

  • What to think about before starting a business
  • Understand how to market your business
  • How to build your brand
  • Different materials to market your business
  • How to use social media to market your business
  • Working with agents
Marketing your business

Marketing your business is key to success.

If you have any questions about this class, please post in the comment section below.

NOTE: This class is available with English subtitles.

Comments

  1. Hi Karl!

    After I watched this video I decided to go to the nearest pastry shop. I asked for the newest cake which has never been photographed. Also I asked for the owner mobil and email address.

    I’ve never shoot food so I watched your video about “Dessert Photography: Raspberry Dessert Photoshoot” then I took few photos of the cake I bought. I sent it to the owner with a little message, how importan is to have good photo and etc… . I allowed her to put the photo on their social platforms and it went really well, She liked it and asked me to take photos of all the cakes they have :))

    It wouldn’t happen if I don’t see your videos. 🙂

    Thanks a lot!
    Levi from Hungary

  2. Hi, Karl,

    I love this segment! I am wondering how relevant you think that actual brochures still are. I have one I designed and was planning to potentially order and send out to lots of places (restaurants, ad agencies, food brands, catering companies, etc…), but, also, not sure if you think a paper brochure is outdated at this point?

    Thank you!

    1. Hi Allison, I actually think in a world awash with digital noise, emails, facebook ads, online marketing that it’s very refreshing to receive something tangible in the mail. I know personally I get lots of photographers or assistants applying for work every year most of them by email with links or photos but when you receive a well presented letter with a book/portfolio it gets your attention and you usually keep it kicking around in your office for a while whereas digital is lost in the inbox within 48 hours. The only problem is that it is a more expensive marketing method.

      1. Hi, Karl,

        That was pretty much exactly my thought process on it, and so glad you validated it. Refreshing, and also a chance to do something a bit different and not get lost in the ethers of the digital world.

        Thank you!

  3. Hey Karl,
    I’m at a point where I need to decide on a plan for marketing. But the budget is slim. I’m thinking local market product photography, with possible corporate work, portraits, environmental profession depending of the business. My list includes business cards, website, postcards and a physical portfolio. I get the feeling I must visit many potential clients to provide a face and a personal touch and leave behind postcards as opposed to just a business card. All marketing media funnelled back to the website of course. Concerning the spec work, which in my case is a viable opportunity and I have been working with this model in mind. I have only sent images to one client without success, but I believe I’ve learned from my mistakes, and that potential client was just a growing phase possibility. But I want to revisit this form of marketing.

    Size of file. Are you sending the full size image? I was sending a reasonable large file (2000px min), but not full size. I’ve sent high quality jpg mostly because I am never sure how savvy they are at viewing a tiff or even a png. Full size files cans be substantial attachments and anything large as an attachment can be a concern to some people. Last thing I want to happen in the file is binned without even a single view. I also think it is important to target the marketing department. To find the right person with the right pair of eyes. Any additional words of advice in these areas?

    1. Hi Gary, all of the top paragraph of what you say is correct in your approach but in the second paragraph I’ve never sent a speculative image in digital form I’ve always sent them a physical print along with a card and a letter.

  4. Hi Karl,

    thank you for this video.
    Would you prior call a client or send an e-mail before sending a brochure?
    I am targeting the beauty sector and just launched a new website, printed new business cards etc, but I am not sure how to begin now. Until today the clients I got are mostly local fashion clients (and I am a Master Photography student) but I tried to build up my beauty portfolio during the last months because I want to get bigger and different clients.

    Thank you in advance and regards
    Christin

    1. Hi Cristin, for me it’s best to send the brochure/portfolio of your images to them first because it then gives a purpose to the call and if they like your work they are going to be happier to speak to you and hopefully recognise your name and take the call. If you just call them out of the blue with no reference then I think it’s going to be too difficult to generate a conversation where they actually believe in you.

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