Two-Light Portraiture

In this live photography workshop, now available to watch as a replay, Karl demonstrates various simple-but-effective two-light setups for portraiture.

You’ll learn how to create beautiful portraits with minimal lights and basic modifiers, including softboxes, octaboxes and snoots.

Karl also demonstrates how you can use white foam board, or a low white studio ceiling, to control your lighting.

Later in the shoot, Karl creates a ‘box room’ within the studio to demonstrate how you can achieve surprisingly good portrait results with simple bare-bulb lighting.

In this class:

  • Lighting techniques for portrait photography
  • Portrait photography: female subject
  • Two-light portraiture
  • Photography with softbox modifiers
  • Photography with octabox modifiers
  • Photography with snoot modifiers
  • Understanding the inverse square law
  • Why you don’t need a light meter
  • Bouncing light off the studio ceiling

If you enjoy this workshop, be sure to check out Creative Portrait Lighting 1.0 and Creative Portrait Lighting 2.0.

You may also like to explore our Two-Light Portraits section.

Questions? Please post them in the comments section below.

Comments

  1. johnleigh

    I missed the live session so was pleased to be able to see this replay and hearing your thoughts and wisdom and seeing you solving the challenges along the way.
    This is all particularly relevant to me as I work from home using my lounge as a small “home studio”. Its an awkward L shape and not much space and 8ft celings so cant get modifiers very high but I work with what I have.

    I wanted to mention in case of interest to some of your viewers that I was quite surprised to realise after some years of using umbrellas, reflectors and softboxes, that often times for the bright, light and airy type fashion, portrait,headshot and concept shoots I work on for models and actors that a bare speedlite pointed at the celing and also a 2nd bare speedlite pointed direct at the talent gives me the key and fill combination that works really well to create punchy and well lit shots. I alternate between the two in different ratios and making the reflected light bigger or smaller with distance.

    When I discovered this previously I was feeling like this didnt “look” professional to have no light modifiers and bouncing off celings and reflectors, but none of the models or actors have any comments or complaints when they see the results. Once I had accepted that I can actually use the small space to this advantage and get over any gear expectations I felt free and liberated and embraced this approach.

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